FRC Blog

Blogosphere Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

February 13, 2009

Here’s some buzz from the blogosphere.

  • An Alternative Stimulus,” Marc Vander Maas, Acton’s Power Blog Today, Congress is voting on the compromised Stimulus Bill, and the Acton Institute sent a staffer out to see if she could come up with a plan. Watch the video to find out more.
  • Requiem for a Republic,” Michael Reagan, Townhall.com Michael Reagan makes a strong point that his father would be rolling in his grave over the travesty of the Stimulus Bill. Throughout the article, Reagan makes such strong points about the excessive and wasteful government spending.
  • Only a wicked, despicable monster would do this,” Voices Carry

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(Un)planned Parenthood

by Family Research Council

February 13, 2009

Earlier this week we took a look at Planned Parenthood’s burgeoning abortion industry. While the nation’s overall induced abortion count is declining, Planned Parenthood’s is soaring. The chart below adds two more trend lines, the number of “emergency contraceptive” kits (a.k.a. Plan B, morning after pills) distributed and the number of adoption referrals made each year by all Planned Parenthood affiliates nationwide. Plan B distribution is brisk, even soaring, and if abortions are being averted by this lucrative tactic, it has yet to show up in the agency’s own clinical data.

Planned-Parenthood-Chart-graph.gif

As you can see regarding the adoption referrals, you can hardly see the adoption referrals. The bright yellow line that crawls along the x axis of the graph is Planned Parenthood’s minuscule involvement in this life-giving option. Roughly 120 babies die in their perimeter for every one that gets a chance at adoption placement. Families are unplanned, not formed, through this agency.

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Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

February 13, 2009

Here’s what we are reading today.

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Deposing a Czar, Scraping the Bottom of the Barrel

by Robert Morrison

February 13, 2009

Washington, D.C.’s regular listeners to Bill Bennett’s “Morning in America” talk show got a rude awakening this week. First, there was nothing but static on AM 570, WTNT. Then, the former cabinet member and former “Drug Czar” was unceremoniously deposed and replaced by the egregious Mancow. Those who follow Bennett online or on XM/SIRIUS, as well as Bennett’s enthusiastic national audience were able yesterday to hear Dr. Scott Teitelbaum-an internationally respected authority on the hazards of drug use. Dr. Teitelbaum warns about the new potency of marijuana. Listeners to Mancow heard him mooing about boycotting Kellogg’s. He’s mad at the cereal giant because they dropped Michael Phelps from their advertising after the Olympic swimmer was caught on camera inhaling from a bong.

Mancow may be more in tune with the temper of these “high times,” it should be noted. “Harm reduction” is the current buzz-word on handling the drug problem. Even PBS travelogues-which used to be a child-safe zone-have been enlisted to soften up public opinion. In a documentary on Switzerland this week, viewers got to see pot-smokers happily sharing parks with hard-working Swiss. Switzerland’s laissez faire approach to drug use was described as “civilized.” Amid views of the beautiful cathedrals and Medieval streets of Bern, we were treated to the sight of drug addicts getting clean needles from openly available vending machines. Men’s rooms-not your usual travel fare on TV-were shown with blue lights. That’s so those who mainline drugs cannot find their veins and will stay out of the loo. What PBS did not show were the pictures brought back to us at FRC over a decade ago, photos that depict the other side of the soft-focus drug-users paradise offered up PBS. In those photos, we could see young men and women, lying on railroad tracks, their eyes turned back in their heads. Unconscious, overdosed, their arms with drug needles still protruding, their life’s blood spattered all over them. It’s not a “Heidi” portrait of the Alpine republic; it’s a vision of hell. Harm reduction is a euphemism for the real message that the Swiss government is sending to its young people tragically addicted to drugs:  “We don’t care if you drop dead. In fact, we will even help you.”

By replacing Bill Bennett with Mancow, the owners of WTNT are also replacing Bennett’s cerebral “NPR for our side” with a braying know nothing. There are other ways to kill conservative talk radio than federal regulation. You can banish Bennett’s brand of intelligence, candor and goodwill and call it a business decision. Maybe it’s the station owners’ blue light special.

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Change Watch Backgrounder: Sanjay Gupta

by David Prentice

February 12, 2009

POSITION: SURGEON GENERAL

 

NOMINEE: Sanjay Gupta

BIRTH DATE: October 23, 1969 in Novi, MI

EDUCATION:

M.D. 1992, University of Michigan Medical School

B.A. in Medical Sciences, University of Michigan

(Interflex 6-year program, combining pre-medical and medical school, accepted directly from high school)

FAMILY: Married to Rebecca Olson Gupta; two daughters: Sage & Skye

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Blogosphere Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

February 12, 2009

Here’s some of the buzz from the blogosphere today.

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Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

February 12, 2009

Here’s what we are reading today.

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What’s the big deal about stem cells?

by Jared Bridges

February 12, 2009

If you’ve ever been confused about the national debate over stem cell research, you’re not alone.  Politicians, preachers, and pedestrians alike are likely to be confused, given the vague rhetoric that’s often thrown about. 

For a good primer on the debate, and to learn about the difference between adult and embryonic stem cells, which ones are ethical and which were not — or which is truly yielding successful treatments,  tune in today at 11:00 a.m. EST for the live webcast of a lecture by FRC’s Dr. David Prentice.  In “The Audacity of Hype: Embryonic Stem Cells — Wasting Taxpayer Lives and Wasting Taxpayer Dollars,” Dr. Prentice examines “the real facts on the science and the difference between hype and hope” in the stem cell debate.

View the webcast here.

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