FRC Blog

Marriage Leads to Prosperity—not Vice Versa

by Tony Perkins

March 6, 2007

The Washington Post reported yesterday on statistics which show that married couples have higher incomes than single people or cohabiting couples, and that children raised by married couples are less likely to live in poverty than children raised by single or cohabiting parents. This should come as no surprise.

FRC has been reporting on this “wealth” of data for years, in publications like The Family Portrait. What is surprising is how the Post chose to spin this story. Instead of praising marriage as a ticket to prosperity, it seemed to lament the greed of those who wed, saying that the institution is “becoming the self-selected province of the college-educated and the affluent,” a “luxury item” that is “helping to drive a well-documented increase in income inequality.”

When the Post says that “the marriage gap appears to be driven primarily by education and income,” the cart is pulling the horse. Economic prosperity and educational advancement (especially for children) are driven by the decision to marry (before having kids) and staying married—not the other way around. The cost of the marriage license is the best investment most couples ever make.

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Poll Position

by Tony Perkins

March 6, 2007

At the annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), every GOP presidential candidate but Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) tried to stake a claim for conservative support. The results of CPAC’s presidential straw poll indicate that voters are grappling to find candidates whose platform addresses both the crisis abroad and the dilemmas at home.

Of 1,705 registrants, 21 percent backed former Gov. Mitt Romney (R-Mass.) for President. Rudy Giuliani, who was given a prime-time slot at the event, came in second-place with just 17 percent of the vote. Senator Sam Brownback received 15%. The poll also surveyed conservatives for their opinion on what the government’s priorities ought to be. Half responded that “their most important goal is to promote individual freedom by reducing the size of government.”

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Barna on the “God Gap”

by Family Research Council

March 5, 2007

A new survey from The Barna Group explores the so-called “God gap” between Republicans and Democrats, examining 32 measures of religious commitment, belief and activity. The study shows that while Republicans continue to hold advantage in attracting born again Christian voters, Democrats are not as far behind on measures of Christian commitment as might be assumed.

The study finds that Republicans were more likely than Democrats to:

  • Strongly assert that the Bible is accurate in all of the principles it teaches (57% versus 40%)
  • Twice as likely to believe Satan is a real spiritual entity (33% versus 17%)
  • More likely to reject the idea that good works can earn salvation (35% versus 23%)
  • More commonly describe themselves as absolutely committed to Christianity (61% versus 48%)

The report also notes that 53% of Republicans say they attended church in the last seven days (compared with 41% of Democrats) and only 22% of Republicans qualified as unchurched (as opposed to 34% among Democrats).

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Family Facts #4

by Family Research Council

March 5, 2007

On average, teens from intact families with frequent religious attendance earned the highest GPA (2.94) when compared to (a) their peers from intact families with low to no religious attendance (2.75), (b) peers from non-intact families with frequent religious attendance (2.72), and (c) peers from non-intact families with low to no religious attendance (2.48).

Source: Fagan, Patrick, A Portrait of Family and Religion in America: Key Outcomes for the Common Good, (Washington, D.C.: The Heritage Foundation 2006)

(HT: FamilyFacts.org)

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Brownback Getting Warm Reception Too

by Family Research Council

March 2, 2007

Sam Brownback now speaking and he is getting a warm reception too. (Though there are no crowds around the monitors in the exhibit hall.)

It turns out that the line to get in the ballroom stretches down around, and around and around all the way down several hallways back to the exhibit hall. It’s incredible.

Brownback began saying he was planning to follow the Yellow Brick Road to the White House… (seems to be losing a little steam as he repeats it.)

Then early he said he wants to be the “The Family President” and work to rebuild the American family.

Later he held up two huge volumes of the IRS code (flash bulbs going off) and said it “deserves to be taken behind the barn and killed with a dull axe.”

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Giuliani at CPAC

by Family Research Council

March 2, 2007

He’s speaking now to a standing-room only crowd in the Regency Ballroom here at the Omni-Shoreham. I’m in the exhibit hall where there are at least 3 big-screen televisions with crowds jammed around them watching intently.

He’s getting a rock stars reception.

He started off slow and seemed nervous. And also almost immediately launched into the “What I Learned From Ronald Reagan” schtick.

He’s concluding now … without having said one word about social issues.

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Senor, or Senorita? In Spain, it’s the thought that counts

by Jared Bridges

March 2, 2007

When it comes to gender in Spain, anatomy is a gray area:

Spain’s parliament on Thursday passed a law allowing transsexuals to change their name and gender on official documents without needing to undergo surgery first.

Now that sex selection is ultimately up to the individual, rather than anatomy, those who were a little nervous about having the surgery can rest easy. All that’s required for a person to officially change his or her (or is it her or his?) sex is “to present an official medical diagnosis stating a clinically proven case of gender dysfunction and to have undergone appropriate treatment for two years before changes in identity documents can be performed.”

Somebody better double-check Spain’s “women’s” basketball team at the next Olympic games…

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Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ Telling of Congressional Priorities

by Tony Perkins

March 2, 2007

You may not have asked, but I’ll tell you any way. Wednesday, Rep. Marty Meehan (D-MA) reintroduced legislation that would not only repeal the military’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy but also the 200-year-old law that bans homosexuals from openly serving in the military. Citing opinion polls, Meehan says the general support for his bill is growing. However, what matters in this case is not what the latest poll says, but what’s best for our military and the men and women who serve. The same study that found higher civilian backing for the repeal also showed overwhelming opposition to change among our servicemen. Only 26 percent of soldiers support a move to allow gays to serve openly. With the demands on the Armed Services, Meehan estimates that over 40,000 homosexuals would join the military if the ban is lifted.

What he doesn’t address are the tens of thousands who would not join or who would leave the service if the legislation is passed. As a veteran of the Marine Corps I can say that the defense of our country should not be sacrificed for the promotion of a political agenda.

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