Category archives: Family Facts

Family Facts #12

by Family Research Council

April 26, 2007

Teen girls from intact families with frequent religious attendance averaged the fewest sexual partners (0.47) when compare to (a) their peers from non-intact families with frequent religious attendance (0.93), (b) peers from intact families with low to no religious attendance (1.14), and (c) peers from non-intact families with low to no religious attendance (1.55).

Source: Fagan, Patrick, A Portrait of Family and Religion in America: Key Outcomes for the Common Good, (Washington, D.C.: The Heritage Foundation 2006), pp. .

(HT: FamilyFacts.org)

Family Facts #11

by Family Research Council

April 13, 2007

Adolescents living at home with two parents were 20% less likely to have ever had sexual intercourse when compared to adolescents not living at home with two parents.

Source: “Friends religiosity and first sex.” Adamczyk, A., Felson, J.

Social Science Research Vol. in press, Number . , 2006. Page(s) NA.

(HT: FamilyFacts.org)

Family Facts #10

by Family Research Council

April 4, 2007

Among a sample of adolescent virgins, those living at home with two parents were roughly 38% less likely to engage in sexual activity for the first time during the following year when compared to adolescents not living at home with two parents.

Source: “Friends religiosity and first sex.” Adamczyk, A., Felson, J.

Social Science Research Vol. in press, Number . , 2006. Page(s) NA.

(HT: FamilyFacts.org)

Family Facts #9

by Family Research Council

March 29, 2007

The greater the fathers’ involvement was, the lower the level of adolescents’ behavioral problems, both in terms of aggression and antisocial behavior and negative feelings such as anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem. Though these behavioral problems were greatest among youths who said they did not have a father, the negative emotions were at the same level among those with no fathers and those with fathers who had low levels of involvement.

Source: “Family Structure, Father Involvement, and Adolescent Behavioral Outcomes” Carlson, Marcia J. Journal of Marriage and Family Vol. 68, Number 1. February, 2006. Page(s) 137-154.

(HT: FamilyFacts.org)

Family Facts #8

by Family Research Council

March 20, 2007

Even when controlling for maternal characteristics and background characteristics, adolescents living with both biological parents who were continuously married exhibited lower levels of problem behavior than peers from any other family type.

Source: “Family Structure, Father Involvement, and Adolescent Behavioral Outcomes”

Carlson, Marcia J. Journal of Marriage and Family Vol. 68, Number 1. February, 2006. Page(s) 137-154.

(HT: FamilyFacts.org

Family Facts #7

by Family Research Council

March 14, 2007

On average, Catholic high school graduates were 7 to 11 percent more likely to vote when they reached young adulthood compared with graduates of public high schools, after controlling for school selectivity.

Source: “The Effects of Catholic Schooling on Civic Participation” Dee, Thomas S. International Tax and Public Finance Vol. 12, Number 5. , 2005. Page(s) 605-625.

(HT: FamilyFacts.org

Family Facts #6

by Family Research Council

March 12, 2007

Pregnant women who were not married or living with a partner were more likely to have a first-trimester miscarriage than those who were married or living with a partner.

Source: “Risk Factors for First Trimester Miscarriage—Results from a UK-Population-Based Case-Control Study” Maconochie, N. Doyle, P., Prior, S., and Simmons, R.

London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Vol. OnlineEarly, Number . December, 2006. Page(s) 1-17.

(HT: FamilyFacts.org)

Family Facts #5

by Family Research Council

March 8, 2007

According to a national survey on volunteering, among respondents who belonged to a house of worship, 61 percent of those whose parents volunteered likewise served as volunteers, and 44 percent of those whose parents did not volunteer served as volunteers. Among those with no religious affiliation whose parents did not volunteer, only 30 percent volunteered.

Source: Brooks, Arthur C., Who Really Cares: America’s Charity Divide, (New York: Basic Books 2006), pp. 97-114.

(HT: FamilyFacts.org)

Family Facts #4

by Family Research Council

March 5, 2007

On average, teens from intact families with frequent religious attendance earned the highest GPA (2.94) when compared to (a) their peers from intact families with low to no religious attendance (2.75), (b) peers from non-intact families with frequent religious attendance (2.72), and (c) peers from non-intact families with low to no religious attendance (2.48).

Source: Fagan, Patrick, A Portrait of Family and Religion in America: Key Outcomes for the Common Good, (Washington, D.C.: The Heritage Foundation 2006)

(HT: FamilyFacts.org)

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