Category archives: Misc.

Who Cares What Era We’re In?

by Rob Schwarzwalder

November 19, 2015

Having spent two full days at the annual gathering of the Evangelical Theological Society, I’ve heard myriad comments from lecturers and participants along the following lines concerning where Evangelicals find themselves in contemporary American society:

We live in a post-Christian culture.”

We live in an era of great promise.”

We are a minority and should ask for protected status.” (Yes, in a seminar I attended, this was seriously proposed.)

The decline of our culture is inevitable.”

The reasons for hope are great.”

As my friend Matt Anderson, founding editor of Mere Orthodoxy, said to me earlier today, in one profound sense, what difference does it make?

Of course, understanding the times gives us a map by which we can better communicate with the current generation, what the critical issues facing our country are, and how Christians can then persuade our contemporaries that the Gospel offers present and eternal hope and how God’s standards for society afford great blessing to everyone in it.

With that said, endless pondering over our position in society has become a near-closet industry among the Evangelical intelligentsia. It is only natural that in the wake of the Supreme Court’s fiat dictum on same-sex marriage this past summer, the continuing horror of abortion, genuine and growing threats to the practice of religious liberty, and other concerns as diverse as sex trafficking and domestic terrorism, that trying to understand how we are perceived, where our opportunities lie, where the dangers lurk, and how we speak winsomely, wisely, truthfully, and convincingly to our increasingly diverse society is not just appropriate but necessary, even imperative.

Yet meticulous and repetitive analysis removes our focus from where it should be—Christ and His Good News—and fosters a surfeit of gloom in some and a general sense of ennui in many. We are in a race for the glory of God (Hebrews 12:1-2). That race will not be won by continuous chin-pulling or hand-wringing but by discipline, speed, and agility harnessed in pursuit of a longed-for goal. For Christians, that goal is “the high calling of God in Christ Jesus” (Philippians 3:14), a calling which includes reaching the lost, protecting the weak, and upholding human dignity. 

So, by all means, let’s continue healthy reflection on the cultural canvas before us. But let us not become so immobilized that we don’t work to infuse it with the colors of life and joy offered by the living Savior. The “welfare of the city” (Jeremiah 29:7) and the souls of men require no less.

Dear Armed Services Member: You Make Us Proud

by Joshua Denton

November 11, 2015

A simple “thanks” seems so insufficient today.

Today is the designated day where we show our appreciation for the men and women in uniform who have sacrificed in order to preserve freedom and protect our Union. It is most appropriate that these brave individuals are honored, and that we create a special holiday for them.

One day is insufficient to truly appreciate all that they have put on the line so that we can enjoy freedom and live in tranquility.

Some gave years. Years apart from their homes. Apart from their fiancé, or spouse. Apart from their families and children. Missing them. Wondering. Worrying.

Some lost limbs. Never again to travel around with the same abilities and mobility.

Some lost their best buddies. Some turned around and had a best friend fall lifeless into their arms.

Some lost memories of the past. Cherished moments forgotten, relatives and friends now unknown to them.

Some gave all. They paid the ultimate sacrifice. A life. For your freedom. For your happiness.

Freedom is a thing to be cherished.

To the brave men and women, past and present, who are members of the Armed Forces of the United States of America, we salute you.

Not just today, in this month of November, on Veterans Day. We appreciate you every day. We think of you often.

Dear Armed Services Member: You make us proud.

Thank you for your service. 

Sexual Abuse of “Dancing Boys” in Afghanistan – Bacha Bazi and Its Impact on Americans Serving There

by Chris Gacek

September 22, 2015

In a significant article, the New York Times has broached the subject of the rampant sexual abuse of young children and teens by Afghan men.  The story is tied to its reporting on the effects this has had on American forces in Afghanistan who have been told to ignore such acts – even if they occur in their presence or on military bases.  As the story notes, in one example, “Dan Quinn was relieved of his Special Forces command after a fight with a U.S.-backed militia leader who had a boy as a sex slave chained to his bed.”  His story and those of two other Americans is recounted.  Apparently, there has been much personal and career damage caused by this amoral policy of non-intervention.

As it turns out, in Afghanistan there is a ritualized form of sexual abuse called  “bacha bazi” – or boy play.  (The practice was supposedly banned under the Taliban, and it is nominally illegal under current Afghan law.)  The boys are often trained to dance and dress as young girls before being used for sex.  Some boys are just sodomized if they can’t learn these perverse geisha-like talents. 

An Afghan journalist, Najibullah Quraishi, produced a documentary, “The Dancing Boys of Afghanistan,” that was shown in London in late March 2010 (run time: 52 min; this version is available on  In the United States, a slightly longer and more polished production was aired on PBS’s Frontline in April 2010 under the same title.  It can be found here

The nation needs to support the efforts of Reps. Duncan Hunter (R-CA) and Vern Buchanan (R-FL) who are trying to investigate this horrific practice and salvage the career of Sgt. First Class Charles Martland, a member of the Special Forces who joined Captain Quinn in beating up the Afghan who is reportedly a child-molesting commander.

Never Forget

by Joshua Denton

September 11, 2015

Today marks the 14th anniversary since the attacks on our nation on September 11, 2001.

The attacks of that painful day marked the greatest single loss of life of rescue personnel in American history. It also was the largest loss of life resulting from a foreign attack on American soil.

This past summer I had the chance to visit for the first time the original site of the Twin Towers.  According to its website, the Memorial’s twin reflecting pools are each nearly an acre in size and feature the largest manmade waterfalls in the North America. The pools sit within the footprints where the Twin Towers once stood.

Bronze panels inscribed with the names of every single person lost in the attacks are a somber testament surrounding the reflecting pools.

I also had the privilege of visiting the 9/11 Museum. It is both awe-inspiring and graphic.  On that day, strangers became friends, helping those who were suffering. On that day rescue workers climbed to their deaths helping occupants of the buildings descend to the hope of life below.

Many displays are very emotional, but one that really struck me was the display of the cross erected at Ground Zero. As the world watched how America would react in this time of unspeakable grief, we bonded together with each other. Literally at the foot of the Cross, which was formed miraculously out of the steel beams of the collapsed buildings.  It remains as it was then,  a symbol of hope and a reminder of Him who sacrificed for all for us.  And it reminds us of those brave men and women who gave their lives on 9/11 so others might live.

The rubbish took a total of eight months to clear, after which the rebuilding process began.

In 2014, the One World Trade Center was completed, becoming the tallest building in the United States with more than 100 stories. 

Today, we remember those whose lives were taken on that fateful day 14 years ago. We will never forget.

Chick and Ruth’s Delly: After half a century, it’s still about family

by Robert Morrison

August 17, 2015

Here’s an upbeat family story about an Annapolis institution, Chick ‘n’ Ruth’s Delly. In business now for fifty years, this orange Formica, classic American eatery is known for its good food and good cheer. You can even order a sandwich named for your favorite Maryland politico. Best of all in this state that gave us the Star Spangled Banner is the daily Pledge of Allegiance ceremony (8:30 am weekdays/9:30 am weekends).

Click here to read the entire story.


Proud to Be

by Joshua Denton

July 8, 2015

I am proud to be an American. I am proud of many things my country has done throughout the course of its history. I do not approve of all of our policies or decisions our leaders or governing bodies have made, but I still firmly believe that I am blessed to have been born in America.

Our founding is richly rooted in Christianity and principles of religious liberty. Yet even as I rejoice to be a citizen of this great nation, I lament that we are in a national identity crisis. All around us it seems people are wondering who we are supposed to be as a nation. What principles are important to us? What is freedom? What is equality? Who are we as individuals? What is our role in society? What is our country’s role in the world?

Abraham Lincoln wrote that the equality of men was the “central idea” of our Republic.  In our time, that idea has been redefined wrongly and diminished cruelly – same-sex “marriage” and abortion, respectively, speak to these errors.

Yet Christian Americans - citizens of our republic - find their identity in Christ and in the nature of the humanity God has given us.  We should carry a confident humility in what God has created us to be.

1)  Proud to be one blood

From one man he made all the nations, that they should inhabit the whole earth; and he marked out their appointed times in history and the boundaries of their lands. God did this so that they would seek him and perhaps reach out for him and find him, though he is not far from any one of us.  ‘For in him we live and move and have our being.’ As some of your own poets have said, ‘We are his offspring. – Acts 17:26-28

We all were created of equal by and for God. Every person has intrinsic worth.

Historically, there have been prejudices of race, class, and gender. But Christians know that every person, from conception onward, possesses God’s image and likeness, even if it has been marred by the curse of the fall.

2) Proud to be one community

                So in Christ Jesus you are all children of God through faith, for all of you who were baptized        into Christ have clothed yourselves with Christ. There is neither Jew nor Gentile, neither slave            nor free, nor is there male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus. – Gal. 3:26-28

Through faith in Christ Jesus all are the children of God. We are all sinners saved by grace and without Christ we would be nothing.

Paul addresses all the prejudices that we deal with today. Race. Class or status. Gender. He tells us that as believers in Christ we are all equals regardless of the distinctions that our society is so prevalent to box us all into. One race is no better than another. Rich is not better than poor. Man is not better than woman, neither is woman better than man. The church is one community – one family. Paul writes, As a prisoner for the Lord, then, I urge you to live a life worthy of the calling you have received. Be completely humble and gentle; be patient, bearing with one another in love. Make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace. There is one body and one Spirit, just as you were called to one hope when you were called; one Lord, one faith, one baptism; one God and Father of all, who is over all and through all and in all.– Eph. 4:1-6

This passage describes how the church should interact with each other and those who have not yet come to know Christ.

3)  Proud to be of one mission

Our purpose is to show forth the image of God so that His glory may be seen in us.

He told them, “This is what is written: The Messiah will suffer and rise from the dead on the third day, and repentance for the forgiveness of sins will be preached in his name to all nations, beginning at Jerusalem. You are witnesses of these things. I am going to send you what my Father has promised; but stay in the city until you have been clothed with power from on high.– Luke 24:46-49

This has come to be known as the Great Commission, and were some of Jesus’ last instructions to his disciples before his ascension. We are Christ’s image-bearers on earth.

 Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age. – Matt. 28:19-20

I am grateful to be a Christian and because of Jesus Christ I share true equality of value with everyone – equal race, equal gender, equal mission, and equal status.

But by the grace of God I am what I am: and his grace which was bestowed upon me was not in vain; but I labored more abundantly than they all: yet not I, but the grace of God which was with me. – 1 Cor. 15:10

I am proud to be an American. But my faith in Christ transcends national loyalty and defines my very being. 

*This article was written using the author’s notes from a recent sermon delivered by Lead Pastor Deamon Scapin, of TriumphDC. Used with permission.

Lady Liberty’s 130th Birthday in America

by Joshua Denton

June 17, 2015

The Statue of Liberty is just that – an icon of American liberty. The Lady in the Harbor arrived in America 130 years ago today. She stands for all that we as a nation represent and all that we as American citizens believe in. Religiously, politically, socially, economically – America is a nation that is overflowing with a rich heritage of Christianity.

Emma Lazarus wrote the following sonnet that is now placed on Lady Liberty’s pedestal.

’Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!’ cries she
With silent lips. ‘Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”

If ever there was a mission minded message it would be the famous words of this poem. These are words that thrill the heart strings of all who love liberty and freedom. I am extremely proud to be a citizen of a nation that has such a strong foundation based on biblical principles of morality, freedom, and justice for all. As American citizens we do have a responsibility to extend the freedoms that we enjoy to others, and we also have a responsibility to protect our own freedoms.

James Truslow Adams, in his book The Epic of America, which was written in 1931, stated that the American dream is “that dream of a land in which life should be better and richer and fuller for everyone, with opportunity for each according to ability or achievement. It is a difficult dream for the European upper classes to interpret adequately, and too many of us ourselves have grown weary and mistrustful of it. It is not a dream of motor cars and high wages merely, but a dream of social order in which each man and each woman shall be able to attain to the fullest stature of which they are innately capable, and be recognized by others for what they are, regardless of the fortuitous circumstances of birth or position.” (p.214-215)

It is because of America’s rich Christian heritage that we have been a nation that traditionally is known as a place of safe-haven and refuge from persecution, prosecution, harassment, and torture because of our religious beliefs. A place where citizens are free to worship God according to conscience. In America we have liberty to worship God without facing more than mild opposition. Sadly, because not all nations have a Christian background like America, their citizens do not enjoy this privilege that we as Americans to often take for granted. A perfect example is these two pastors from Sudan who have been arrested and are facing the death penalty because of their faith in Christ. And we think it’s rough when we have to take a stand that’s “not cool.”

Liberty is a thing to be cherished. If we want to preserve liberty, freedoms, and the “American dream” we need to take lessons from history, previous governments, past heroes, and our recent problems. The Marquis de Lafayette referred to himself as “a missionary of liberty.” By passing along our rich Christian heritage we can extend the liberties and freedoms that we currently enjoy to future generations and others. 

Talking Turkey Tumult?

by Robert Morrison

June 11, 2015

America’s business newspaper of record, the Wall Street Journal, headlined this story this week: “Key Ally Turkey Braces for Tumult.” Generally, business does not like “tumult” and it especially doesn’t like it in a country viewed as vital to U.S. national interests. Turkey, a founding member of the NATO alliance, has been moving out of the orbit of American friends in recent years. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (pronounced air-doo-WAN) has been pushing this large Muslim majority country into the arms of the jihadists. But last weekend’s voting in Turkey resulted in a loss of a majority in Parliament by Erdogan’s Justice and Development Party (AKP), which has ruled Turkey since 2002.

Erdogan tried five years ago to run the Israeli blockade of Gaza. The ship, the Mavi Marmara, was “discreetly encouraged” by Erdogan’s government. She was bringing only “humanitarian” aid to the people in that strip of land adjoining Israel. But Gaza is controlled by the terrorist gang, Hamas.

Humanitarian aid in Gaza includes construction materials that can be used, yes, to repair bomb damage from Israeli raids. But it can also be used to build Metro-size tunnels. Hamas is burrowing under Israeli schools and hospitals. To prevent a future terrorist strike by Hamas fighters emerging on Israel’s side of the border, Israel’s Defense Force (IDF) launched Operation Protective Edge last summer.

So “tumult” for Ergodan and his cronies may be good news for us, for Americans, for Israelis, and perhaps even for Christians.

My best Turkish news this week came from friends who spoke of church planting among Turkish immigrants in Germany and who told me that even in Turkey itself, there are green shoots springing up, budding church communities. This in a land where one hundred years ago this year, millions of Christian Armenians were killed. “Who remembers the Armenians?” said Adolf Hitler as he planned his Holocaust of the Jews.

We can answer him: We do! And it is for the sake of the people of that troubled region that we demand religious freedom. It is because too many there murder their neighbors who worship differently that they have seen a century of tumult.

America has a lesson to teach the world. When George Washington greeted the Hebrew Congregation at Newport in 1790, he quoted Scripture to them: “Let each sit under his own vine and fig tree and let there be none to make him afraid.” That has too rarely been true in the Mideast. And, today, it is a heritage increasingly at risk here at home.

In demanding religious freedom for the people of Turkey, we assert a fundamental human right. And we strengthen our own resolve as Americans. 

Adoption May Not Always Be Perfect, but It Saves a Life

by Chris Gacek

June 9, 2015

The actress, Kate Mulgrew, has had a long career extending back to the mid-1970s when she had her first major role on an ABC daytime drama called “Ryan’s Hope.” Mulgrew’s New York Catholic family in “Ryan’s Hope” resembled her own Irish Catholic family with nine children from Dubuque, Iowa. Portraying “Mary Ryan” must have been charted ground for her, but she took a few detours with great consequences. Mulgrew discusses her life in an autobiography, Born with Teeth, that was published this past April.

Relevant for our purposes is her story relating to adoption. Mulgrew moved to New York to study acting when she was just eighteen, and landed her “Ryan’s Hope” role several years later. She was an immediate sensation, but as her career took off she entered into a sexual relationship with a member of the television production staff and became pregnant. They were both very young. Mulgrew didn’t feel that she could raise a child, but she rejected abortion. Instead, Mulgrew let another family adopt her daughter. Mulgrew was allowed only a brief view of her baby, but that never stopped her from thinking about the daughter from whom she had been separated. It turns out they were both searching for each other.

This CBS Sunday Morning interview sheds light on how the reunion came about over twenty years later in 2001. You meet her daughter and see that they do love each other. One gets a palpable sense of the pain Mulgrew and her daughter experienced. There is heartache and regret, but I also thought that Kate Mulgrew needs to give herself a break. After making that initial mistake, she didn’t make the greater one. And, the mistake she did not make has given her a daughter she loves so intensely. A daughter who loves her in return.

Perhaps, it is too much to wish for, but I hope Kate Mulgrew someday could meet Ryan and Bethany Bomberger who run the Radiance Foundation, a pro-adoption organization. Ryan was conceived in a rape but has lived a wonderful life though through his adoption. Here is the Radiance Foundation’s beautiful statement about their campaign, Adopted and Loved:

PLEASE VISIT OUR ADOPTION AWARENESS INITIATIVE: Millions have experienced the beauty of adoption over this past century. Yet very few people understand the reality of how adoption UNLEASHES the Possibility of not just the child, but the family and the community…and sometimes, the world. Sacrifice is at the heart of adoption, and the reward is great. This presentation illuminates adoption, dispels myths, shares moving personal stories, and provides potential adoptive parents tools and online resources to discover how adoption can change lives.

Adoption is a love story, but not always an easy one. Kate Mulgrew, thank you for doing the good thing and the loving thing when the chips were down.

Christianity’s Revolutionary Recognition of Women as Equals

by David J. Theroux

June 5, 2015

For millennia, marriage has been universal to civilization with most marriage ceremonies involving religion. Yet for years, traditional marriage and the family have been subjected to secular ridicule, with the family increasingly politicized and socialized by “progressive” government bureaucracies.

The result has been an unprecedented decline of the family in America, producing increasing rates of non-marital births, divorces, juvenile crime, substance abuse, and other pathologies. However, this trend need not be permanent. Put simply, the progressive narrative that supports it is unfounded and refuted by the witness of cultural experience.

The biblical account of marriage begins with one man and one woman: “God created man in His own image, in the image of God He created him; male and female He created them. God blessed them.’” And, “For this reason a man shall leave his father and his mother, and be joined to his wife; and they shall become one flesh.” Jesus later called humanity back to these records (Matthew 19:4–5, Mark 10:6–8), and the Christian story is viewed as ending with the wedding of Christ with His bride, the Church, from which all Christian discussions of marriage stem.

In Christianity, marriage is hence a sacred union of the highest order. However, since the Enlightenment, secularism has defined marriage as a civil union. Many academics view traditional marriage as a patriarchy to dominate and oppress women, all supported by despots animated by their Christian faith. Such a narrative is based on the theory that primitive mankind was egalitarian, matrilineal, and socialist, with communal sexual relations, despite the biological and kinship basis of heterosexual pairing.

However, for thousands of years around the world, a wife was considered a husband’s property. In ancient Jewish communities, almost every adult was married. By age thirteen, a man chose a wife who was betrothed (committed legally to marriage) and, thus, considered de facto married. The man headed the family, with the wife his property. In the Greco-Roman pagan world, marriage was reserved for citizens, and a woman shared her husband’s station as mother of his children, but she and the offspring were his.

While adultery was prohibited for women, no fidelity obligation existed for men. Older men could force marriage on pre-pubescent girls and compel them to have abortions, usually certain death for not only the baby but also the girl. Moreover, according to sociologist Rodney Stark in his book The Rise of Christianity, infanticide was a commonplace, with baby girls disproportionately abandoned, resulting in “131 males per 100 females in the city of Rome, and 140 males per 100 females in Italy, Asia Minor, and North Africa.”

Only with the arrival of Christianity did the status of women change as obligations were placed on husbands. As Stark has shown, “Christians condemned promiscuity in men as well as in women and stressed the obligations of husbands toward wives as well as those of wives toward husbands…. The symmetry of the relationship Paul described was at total variance not only with pagan culture but with Jewish culture as well.

Stark shows that Christianity recognized women as equal to men, all sacred to God. Christian wives did not have abortions (neither did Jewish wives), and Christians opposed infanticide, polygamy, incest, divorce, and adultery—all to women’s benefit. No longer serfs to men, women had dignity, were not rushed into marriages, and served as leaders in rapidly growing Christian communities. Christian women married into more secure families, had better marriages, were not forced to remarry if widowed, and were given assistance when needed. Stark notes Paul’s teaching:

But because of the temptation to immorality, each man should have his own wife and each woman her own husband. The husband should give to his wife her conjugal rights, and likewise the wife to her husband. For the wife does not rule over her own body, but the husband does; likewise the husband does not rule over his own body, but the wife does. (I Corinthians 7:2-4)

Thus, the progressive narrative upon which contemporary, anti-family policies rest, is false. Only through Christianity did women receive full marriage rights and gender equality in fidelity. The private, monogamous family has served well the human needs for love and companionship, economic and social well-being, and the rearing of children.

Abandoning these lessons is at the root of the modern decline of the family, and government can only further undermine the rights and benefits that have uplifted the lives of countless men, women, and children through Christian-inspired marriage.

To restore the family, civic and religious leaders must continue to challenge such folly and advance reforms that strengthen rather than weaken the most extraordinarily successful social unit in history – the family. In this regard, religious and secular leaders should protect the sovereignty of religious institutions to perform marriages according to their own beliefs.


*David J. Theroux is founder, president and chief executive officer of the Independent Institute in Oakland, California; founder and president of the C.S. Lewis Society of California; and publisher of The Independent Review.