Month Archives: February 2007

ACLU Orders Mass Exodus Of Ten Commandments

by Tony Perkins

February 27, 2007

Here’s today’s Washington Watch Daily commentary from FRC Radio:

In Florida, the ACLU has issued its own commandment: Thou shalt remove thy biblical monument. The liberal group is referring to a granite sculpture of the Ten Commandments outside the Dixie County court. It was installed last November after a businessman donated it and the City Council approved it. Because the display invokes the name of God, the ACLU argues that it violates the Establishment Clause. But ironically, its the same God that kicks off the national motto, In God We Trust. Several states have passed bills to protect similar monuments. As one legislator said, I just think its a darn good moral code. And hes not alone. The public strongly supports posting the Ten Commandments on government property. Some polls have shown as much as 77 percent approve of the displays. Thats why its a little surprising that the ACLU resurrected their campaign. All of these lawsuits should have taught them that its hard to get a guilty verdict on the ten most wanted list.

To download this commentary as an MP3, follow this link. To subscribe to the Washington Watch Daily radio commentary, go here.

Deal Of A Lifetime? Abortion Clinics Offer Coupons

by Tony Perkins

February 26, 2007

Here’s today’s Washington Watch Daily commentary from FRC Radio:

In Illinois, abortions may be cheaper by the dozen. The online clinics have issued a coupon thats literally to die for. As part of their gimmick to attract new customers, the Illinois Abortion Clinics site is offering $20 off their first visit. Unfortunately, the discount will come in handy for the states minors, who, thanks to a federal ruling, can still have abortions without their parents knowledge or consent. Two weeks ago, a U.S. District judge refused to enforce a parental notification law that was passed back in 1995. And those online coupons show why the law is an important one. For years, the abortion business has been using the lack of family involvement to lure teens to their clinics for secret abortions. Now other young girls are crossing state lines to take advantage of Illinois loose laws. And until the legislature steps in, theyll have to learn the hard way that abortion is a costly mistakedeal or no deal.

To download this commentary as an MP3, follow this link. To subscribe to the Washington Watch Daily radio commentary, go here.

FRC Web Briefing

by Family Research Council

February 23, 2007

Life & Bioethics

Marriage & Family

Culture & Society

Hint: They’re On Each Side of Iran…

by Family Research Council

February 23, 2007

Dr. Steven Taylor, associate professor of political science at Troy University, is depressed by his student’s lack of geographic knowledge:

Out of 16 students in my general studies World Politics class only 1 could identify Iraq and Afghanistan on a blank map on their exam. One other student found Iraq and another correctly located Afghanistan.

Pardon me while I go weep quietly in the corner.

Well, it’s not exactly as if those countries have been in the news lately. Perhaps we just need more globes in the classroom — or more military veterans.

Gum Game Shows Kids That Extra Restraint Lasts Extra Long

by Tony Perkins

February 23, 2007

Here’s today’s Washington Watch Daily commentary from FRC Radio:

A parent in one Maryland school district say an abstinence program has bitten off more than it can chew. Because of something called the gum game, schools in Montgomery County banned the curriculum. As part of the lesson, instructors handed kids a stick of gum and asked them to take turns chewing it. The idea sounds disgusting, but thats exactly the point. Teachers were trying to get students to understand that if they wouldnt share gum because of the germs, why would they share their beds and risk catching an STD? One official said, This exercise showed a terrible lack of judgment. But the same can be said of pulling the program. Instead of asking instructors to stop playing the game, the Country used it as an excuse to shut them down. Its ironic. These schools have no problem showing kids how to engage in so-called safe sex, but a gum game crosses the line? Montgomery County should restore the abstinence message instead of bursting this programs bubble.

To download this commentary as an MP3, follow this link. To subscribe to the Washington Watch Daily radio commentary, go here.

Cloning Concerns Still Cropping Up in Iowa

by Tony Perkins

February 23, 2007

On Wednesday night, before a packed Statehouse gallery, the Iowa legislature held public hearings on an issue that has spawned debate all across the country. The three-hour proceedings on human cloning illustrated just how divided Iowans are. Most of the scheduled speakers favored overturning the state’s human cloning ban, but they were clearly not representative of the crowded audience who voiced strong opposition to the bill.

While researchers insisted that the law would promote embryonic stem cell research, not human cloning, critics point out that the bill would not only promote human cloning but would legally protect it. State Senator Pat Ward (R-West Des Moines) says the repeal is “not needed, period” because stem cell research without cloning is already happening.

Although scientists argued that the current cloning ban hinders Iowa’s ability to treat disease, one biotech executive disagreed, saying, “The fact that we’re located in Iowa has not hurt our ability to do business with other scientists… [even under] Iowa law.” In an effort to expose this deceitful “stem cell” bill, the Iowa Right to Life Committee and Catholic-based Fidelis have launched a radio campaign to educate citizens before today’s vote. In neighboring Kansas, the House has introduced a bill that forbids the government from funding human cloning research.

Unlike measures elsewhere, this version accurately defines cloning in the terms used by the President’s Council on Bioethics. The state’s scientists are outraged by the language because they fear that the reality of the procedure will deter voters from supporting “progressive” research.

Parental Rights Should Reign ‘Supreme’

by Tony Perkins

February 23, 2007

On Wenesday, FRC filed a “friend-of-the-court” brief with our friends at the Alliance Defense Fund in the U.S. Supreme Court case Fausey v. Hiller. We are arguing that the Court should review the case, which would determine if parents can control “third-party visitation rights.” These cases pit a third party (often a grandparent) against a parent in determining whether visits with the parent’s children will be permitted, and on what terms.

Some states have sought to use a standard (“best interests of the child”) that was developed for mother-and-father disputes and to expand that standard to other relatives and parties. In today’s world these disputes can enmesh families where the grandparents are in fact loving in their intentions.

While recognizing this, FRC maintains that before the state intervenes in a decision made by what the law deems “a fit parent,” the only reasonable standard is to put the burden on the third party to show that the child would suffer harm if such visits were denied. Only such a standard can preserve the fundamental right of parents to supervise the upbringing of their children, a right long ago recognized by the Supreme Court as fundamental under the U.S. Constitution. Churches, counselors and other resources can and should employed to help families achieve reconciliation and enjoy the important cross-generational ties that strong families experience.

Washington Briefing 2007: Be Our Guest!

by Tony Perkins

February 23, 2007

FRC Action is joining with some of the most influential faith-and-family groups, to host an event guaranteed to change the debate in 2008. Focus on the Family Action, American Values and other invited cosponsors are teaming up with us to host The Washington Briefing 2007: Values Voter Summit October 19-21 at the Hilton Washington in downtown D.C. Last year’s event attracted more than 1,800 attendees from 47 states, and coverage from every major media outlet in the country. With a stellar line-up that featured speakers such as Dr. James Dobson, Sean Hannity, Tony Snow, Bill Bennett, Ann Coulter, Newt Gingrich, House and Senate leaders, and dozens more, The Washington Briefing 2006 exceeded all expectations. This year’s event promises to be even bigger. Registration for 2007 opens March 15. Book your registration before May 15 and receive a $25 Early Bird discount.

On Religious Freedom, Justice Is Served

by Tony Perkins

February 22, 2007

Stating that “nothing defines us more as Americans [than] our religious liberties,” Attorney General Alberto Gonzales unveiled the Justice Department’s “First Freedom Project” to the Southern Baptist Executive Committee in Nashville on Tuesday. His new Religious Freedom Task Force will step up enforcement of laws prohibiting discrimination on the basis of religion and will educate churches on how to file complaints about violations of their rights. We applaud Attorney General Gonzales for recognizing the ongoing threat to religious freedom and for taking firm steps to defend our “first freedom.”

Jesus Costume Too Scary

by Family Research Council

February 22, 2007

A suit was filed on Tuesday in Pennsylvania by the Alliance Defense Fund on behalf of a 10 year old boy whose freedoms of religion and free speech were violated. During a Halloween celebration, officials at Willow Hill Elementary School in Glenside, Pennsylvania informed the boy that he could not wear a crown of thorns or tell others that he was Jesus.

Alternatively, school officials said that, because his garb included a robe, he could identify himself as a Roman emperor or some other religiously neutral figure. Since both the boy and his mother found the pagan elements of Halloween offensive, they did not want to celebrate Halloween in the typical manner; however, the mother of the boy also did not want her son to feel isolated from his schoolmates simply because he was not wearing a costume.

As I take stock of the situation, I cant help but chuckle in amazement at the brazenness of school officials. The purported reason for prohibiting the boys costume was that it was in violation of a school ordinance against the promotion of religion.

Apart from the fact that such a policy is no more than a facade for promoting virtually anything but Christianity, the school was not promoting religion by allowing the child to wear a costume. The school did not sanction the costume, obviously did not show support for the custom, and certainly did not give it undue preference over the myriad other costumes present among which were the typical devils and witches.

Upon closer examination, I think what you will see is that religion is defined very narrowly by many secularists: religion = Christianity. Toleration is all-inclusive, with one small exception Christians.

Why do I get the feeling that a Ghandi costume wouldnt have elicited the same response?

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