Walt Disney Pictures and Walden Media are releasing on DVD today their adaptation of the second installment in C.S. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia, Prince Caspian. A lesser-known story than that of its predecessor, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, Prince Caspian brings the four Pevensie children back to a Narnia 1,300 years older, where the ruling humans have constructed a bellicose society that regards the Christ-like Aslan, if it regards him as all, as no more than a mere myth. In many respects a cautionary tale for our own society about the effects of Godlessness, Caspian also delivers an inspirational message about the effects of Godliness when our heroes and a significant portion of Narnians renew their faith in God (Aslan).

Another notable event in the film is the introduction of Reepicheep the mouse, a character whose name could be listed in any dictionary as a synonym for "valour" and "chivalry."

Due to the book's involved backstory, Caspian is the most difficult of the Chronicles to adapt to the screen. The need to rearrange and modify events in the book to accomplish that feat has arguably resulted in a film superior to The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, for which the screenwriters adhered to the book's structure perhaps a bit too religiously. This is forgivable, though, since Lion's narrative is more conducive to cinematic interpretation and less forgiving to structural alterations.