Our redoubtable second President, John Adams of Massachusetts, was inaugurated in Philadelphia on March 4, 1797. He followed two terms of the man revered as "Father of Our Country." The bald and portly Adams was short, but powerfully built. Rising to the occasion, he wore a ceremonial sword for his swearing-in. Some of the senators sniped. "His Rotundity," they called the man who was a genuine hero of the revolution. Adams, like Washington before him, attributed American independence to "the justice of their cause, and the integrity and intelligence of the people, under an overruling Providence which had so signally protected this country from the first." While professing no religious ties himself, he said "a decent respect for Christianity [is] among the best recommendations for the public service." In his diary, Adams later noted that the people who watched him take the oath were weeping. "[W]hether it was from grief or joy, whether from the loss of their beloved President [Washington], or from the accession of an unbeloved one...I know not." Still, John Adams presided over the first peaceful transfer of political power. This was another of Washington's great gifts to the nation. Four years later, in 1801, the defeated John Adams did not attend President Jefferson's inauguration in the new capital of Washington, D.C. He left the vast, empty President's House-in whose cavernous East Room First Lady Abigail Adams had hung her laundry-before dawn. He took the early coach home to the Bay State. Biographer David McCullough tells us that Adams was not the sore loser history thinks he was. He simply wasn't invited to Mr. Jefferson's inauguration. Even in this, however, Adams again made history. This was the first time the government had changed hands in a contested election, the first time the "ins" voluntarily stepped "out." John and Abigail Adams were the first First Family to live in the President's House. Leaving, John offered this prayer: "I pray Heaven to bestow the best of blessings on this house, and on all that shall hereafter inhabit it. May none but wise and honest men every rule under this roof."