S. Truett Cathy, founder of the Chick-fil-A restaurant chain, has died at the age of 93. As the Wall Street Journal notes, he was a champion of "conservatism and chicken," but it omits his other, most profound championship: The good news of Jesus Christ.

Mr. Cathy's comments about his relationship with God shows that his faith was not an ancillary part of his life; it was at the heart of it: "I became a Christian at age 12; that's not to say that everything I've done since that time is becoming to a Christian, but I believe the Lord had blessed us because we recognize Him on this special day we call Sunday ... I do not condemn a person for opening on Sunday; it is just a principle I stand very firmly on for my business."

Mr. Cathy founded the WinShape Foundation out of his deep love for children, born of his own straitened childhood. As its website describes it, "The WinShape Foundation was created by Chick-fil-A founder, S. Truett Cathy, and his wife, Jeannette, in 1982. The simple vision then, as it is today, was to strengthen families and bring people closer to God and each other. Each ministry within the WinShape Foundation is committed to equipping Christ-centered servant leaders who live life on purpose; with purpose; from children to college students, families, couples, business leaders and others in need around the world."

He never lost perspective on what's important; "It's OK to have wealth," said Mr. Cathy, "but keep it in your hands, not in your heart."

Mr. Cathy shared his testimony in his book, Eat Mor Chikin, explaining how Jesus' conversation with Nicodemus on the necessity of being born again changed his life. You can read his account in his book -- or, as I'm sure Mr. Cathy would have agreed, go to the original source (the Gospel of John, chapter 3) and read it for yourself.

A wonderful life, well-lived, not just because Truett Cathy was ethical or kind or generous or successful, but because the love of Jesus infused him.