Category archives: History

This Day in History/Quote of the Day

by Family Research Council

January 6, 2007

On this day in 1643 was the first record of a legal divorce in the American colonies, Anne Clarke of the Massachusetts Bay Colony (any surprise the first destructive element against marriage in the States originated in Massachusetts?) is granted a divorce from her absent and adulterous husband, Denis Clarke, by the Quarter Court of Boston, Massachusetts. In a signed and sealed affidavit presented to John Winthrop Jr., the son of the colony’s founder, Denis Clarke admitted to abandoning his wife, with whom he had two children, for another woman, with whom he had another two children. He also stated his refusal to return to his original wife, thus giving the Puritan court no option but to punish Clarke and grant a divorce to his wife, Anne. The Quarter Court’s final decision read: “Anne Clarke, beeing deserted by Denis Clarke hir husband, and hee refusing to accompany with hir, she is graunted to bee divorced.”

QoD: “A colleague of mine once noted, there is very little difference between men and women. But, VIVE LE DIFFERENCE!!” Warner Brothers romantic skunk, Pepe le Pew, who debuted today in 1945 in the cartoon short Odor-able Kitty.

This Day in History/Quote of the Day

by Family Research Council

December 14, 2006

On this day in 1799, George Washington, the first president of the United States, dies of acute laryngitis at his estate in Mount Vernon, Virginia. George Washington was born in 1732 to a farm family in Westmoreland County, Virginia. i would swear I'm the only one who remembers the cartoonHis first direct military experience came as a lieutenant colonel in the Virginia colonial militia in 1754, when he led a small expedition against the French in the Ohio River valley on behalf of the governor of Virginia. Two years later, Washington took command of the defenses of the western Virginian frontier during the French and Indian War. After the war’s fighting moved elsewhere, he resigned from his military post, returned to a planter’s life, and took a seat in Virginia’s House of Burgesses. In 1774, he represented Virginia at the Continental Congress.

After the American Revolution erupted in 1775, Washington was nominated to be commander in chief of the newly established Continental Army. Some in the Continental Congress opposed his appointment, thinking other candidates were better equipped for the post, but he was ultimately chosen because as a Virginian his leadership helped bind the Southern colonies more closely to the rebellion in New England. After winning the war, the victorious general retired to his estate at Mount Vernon, but in 1787 he heeded his nation’s call and returned to politics to preside over the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In February of 1789 Washington was unanimously elected the first president of the United States. In 1792, he was unanimously reelected but four years later refused a third term. In 1797, he finally began a long-awaited retirement at his estate in Virginia. He died two years later. His friend Henry Lee provided a famous eulogy: “First in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen.”

QoD: “Me and Janet really are two different people.” - Michael Jackson. On this day in 1969 the Jackson Five made their 1st appearance on “Ed Sullivan Show.”

This Day in History/Quote of the Day

by Family Research Council

December 14, 2006

Could i be more obscure?On this day in 1928 the clip on tie was designed. The tie is a bow tie or four in hand tie which is permanently tied into its knot with a dimple just below the knot, which is fixed only to the front of the shirt collar by a metal clip. Many types of occupations require their personnel to wear clip-on ties for safety or efficiency reasons. These occupations include police, paramedics, and engineers. Other people may wear a clip-on tie in lieu of a standard necktie if they do not know how to tie one, while others feel it is less constrictive than a standard necktie.

He had no further intercourse with Spirits, but lived upon the Total Abstinence Principle, ever afterwards; and it was always said of him, that he knew how to keep Christmas well, if any man alive possessed the knowledge. May that be truly said of us, and all of us! And so, as Tiny Tim observed, God Bless Us, Every One!” - From Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol,” published on this day in 1843, selling 6,000 copies.

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