Tag archives: Abortion

Obama at Notre Dame

by Family Research Council

May 18, 2009

Sunday’s speech and the reaction of the Notre Dame community, and Catholics and others worldwide, will be the subject of much comment in the coming days. Some quick thoughts and first impressions:

Without doubt, Obama was eloquent, charming, and seemingly at ease. He had the advantage (a faculty and administration behind him, and the media framing it as the man of reason versus the rabble in the street, with, obligingly, Randall Terry performing that role as if on cue), and he seemed once again to know it. The students, who prepare for this day with years of labor and the love (and labor and cash) of their families behind them, were respectful and, as students tend to be around our rock-star President, wowed by his skill with words, his symbolic meaning in transcending our historic racial divide, and his graceful humor.

As for his speech, it was un-Barackesque in one sense - he came down from Olympus, where pay grades are seldom referred to at all, and made it plain that on the issue of human life, he does in fact disagree with those who stand for its sanctity. But he was Barackesque in striving to minimize those differences, in implying that there is “demonization” of opponents afoot (not from him, of course, just unnamed others), and suggesting that, to borrow an irritating catchphrase from a recent era in U.S. Catholic politics, he is all about “dialogue” with those who disagree with him.

There is the rub. Obama is a man of many mellifluous words, but he is also a man of many unambiguous actions, and every action he has taken to date has been a forthright dismantling of the culture of life and the wall of separation that has existed between taxpayers and abortion. A complete list would include all of his key personnel in White House domestic policy, HHS, State and the Justice Department. His policy enactments include rescinding the Mexico City policy that kept the international abortion industry out of the federal Treasury, rescinding the Bush conscience regulations designed to protect medical and health research personnel from having to participate in or facilitate abortion, eliminating all but a smidgeon of abstinence funding for the pregnancy centers that deal directly with women in need, lifting the ban on the use of District of Columbia funds to pay for abortion in his proposed budget, providing federal funding for experiments that rely on killing embryonic humans in fertility clients, and sending Planned Parenthood an additional $10 million federal love note, matching what they spent to elect him last year.

The President’s efforts to spur “dialogue” involve a low-level White House meeting where groups — including, for the record, FRC — are asked to come in and help craft a plan to “reduce the need for abortion.” To be credible, that plan would have to begin with reversing every decision Obama has made on abortion to date. But note the phraseology, which suggests a fundamental disagreement. Who speaks of a “need for child abuse”? Or a need for white collar crime? Or a need for bribery of public officials? If there is a need for something, just how wrong is it? Planned Parenthood and its allies secured this language in the Democratic Platform last year because they did not want any suggestion from their party that the act of abortion is a moral wrong. But if it is not a moral wrong, then it is hardly something that needs to be reduced, particularly if, as Planned Parenthood insists, it is physically safe and negligible in its mental health implications.

President Obama and his administration have extraordinary message discipline when it comes to these matters. That discipline will be on display again soon in the health care debate when the Democrats on the Hill insist that they are deferring that question to some other body (likely an HHS commission that will likewise pronounce itself for “dialogue”) for resolution. Is there any chance that an Obama-endorsed, government-financed health plan will exclude abortion and taxpayer participation in it? As a state legislator, Obama stood out as a man so concerned about protecting abortion in all circumstances that he led opposed laws to provide care for infants who survive the procedure.

Yesterday Notre Dame gave a high honor to such a man. He spoke eloquently. But the Jesuit fathers who taught me in high school and even a few of the Holy Cross priests who taught me at Notre Dame impressed on me to pay attention to what men do, not just what they say. They cited the Good Book on knowing people by their fruits. With Obama, that begins with what is being done to the fruit of the womb.

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

May 13, 2009

Here’s what we are reading today.

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

May 12, 2009

Here’s what we are reading today.

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

May 11, 2009

Here’s what we are reading today.

Obama’s Grim Fairy Tale

by Robert Morrison

May 7, 2009

President Obama is offering up a new version of the old fable of the stone soup. You’ll recall the Brothers Grimm fairy tale where the strangers come to town, offering nothing but a stone in the bottom of their kettle. They persuade the townspeople to add some potatoes, carrots, and soup bones, just for “garnish.” Soon they had a feast-for free.

In 1976, candidate Jimmy Carter came to Iowa. He said he “didn’t like abortion.” And he pledged to reduce “the need for abortion.” This at least was something.

To most people, the Republican candidate wasn’t even offering a stone. President Ford never mentioned abortion, or the Supreme Court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling that legalized abortion-on-demand. He let the First Lady, Betty Ford, speak out, offering her strongly pro-abortion views.

The Republican Party actually condemned Roe v. Wade in its 1976 platform. But President Ford ignored that fact, and a biased press played up Mrs. Ford’s vocal support. In her memoirs, Betty Ford praised her hubby for “letting me do all the talking about abortion. That was wise of him,” she said. It was wise only if Ford didn’t need Pennsylvania and Ohio.

Liberal journalist Elizabeth Drew praised Carter for wrapping “a liberal policy stance in conservative rhetoric.” Carter went on to win the election. He named hundreds of judges to the federal judiciary, but not one pro-lifer.

He did, however, name the pro-life Joe Califano as Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare, the predecessor to HHS. Carter also supported and signed the Hyde Amendment, which banned federal funding of abortion, something Ford had allowed to go forward.

Obama is using Carter’s successful rhetoric without even a scintilla of Carter’s significant concessions to pro-life sentiment. Under Obama, we are being forced to pay to promote abortions around the world. We may be forced to pay for abortion-on-demand in his health care takeover. Pro-life doctors and nurses could be forced to take part in killing unborn children-or, more likely, killing their careers rather than compromise their conscience. Obama’s rhetoric is appealing, rather like that nice hot stone soup. But his common ground is as lacking in substance as that empty kettle. The morning after, we’ll awake to find it was only “some enchanted evening.”

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

May 7, 2009

Here’s what we are reading today.

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

May 6, 2009

Here’s what we are reading today.

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

May 5, 2009

Here’s what we are reading today.

U.S.A.F. Airman Convicted under Unborn Victims of Violence Act

by Chris Gacek

May 4, 2009

It appears that the Unborn Victims of Violence Act of 2004 (Public Law 108-212) (UVVA) has produced its first conviction. This took place over the weekend pursuant to a court martial at the Elmendorf Air Force Base near Anchorage, Alaska.

United States Airman 1st Class Scott Boie of Milton, Wisconsin, was sentenced on Saturday, May 2nd to nine years, six months in prison after he was found guilty of attempting to kill his unborn child. Boie was tried by a military court made up of ten member of the United States Air Force. The ten panel members convicted Boie late Friday night.

After Boie’s wife, Caylinn, told him that she was pregnant, Boie requested that she get an abortion. After she declined to do so, Boie used his computer to gather information about abortion inducing drugs. Boie discovered that the anti-ulcer drug, misoprostol (Cytotec), could be used. Misoprostol is the second drug in the RU-486 (mifepristone) abortion regimen and is widely used in some countries like Brazil as a cheap abortifacient. (For more information on mifepristone and misoprostol - download and read this FRC pamphlet (PDF): LINK.)

With the help of a fellow serviceman Boie obtained misoprostol and crushed some of the tablets which he placed in his wife’s food. A miscarriage followed one week later. His wife thought the miscarriage occurred naturally, but learned from a friend that her husband had attempted to kill their child. My news accounts do not reveal how Caylinn Boie’s friend learned this. Mrs. Boie confronted her husband about the miscarriage while covertly taping their conversation. Scott Boie confessed to her that he had attempted to kill the baby, and the recording of this confession was played in court.

Boie was also dishonorably discharged, demoted to E-1, and assessed a “total forfeiture of all pay and allowances.”

Congratulations should go to all those who worked to enact the UVVA and to President George W. Bush for signing it.

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