Tag archives: Capitalism

Is Capitalism Over?

by Krystle Gabele

November 15, 2012

Elise Amyx at Values and Capitalism writes about how Christian hipsters are declaring the demise of capitalism. Perhaps, it would be good to know what a Christian hipster stands for and how is capitalism over?

According to Brett McCracken, author of Hipster Christianity: When Church and Cool Collide, a Christian hipster is a young evangelical who strays from the typical stereotypes of the evangelicals of the 80s and 90s and prefers the progressive viewpoints, as well as intellectual Christianity. While most evangelicals prefer to help Republicans, the Christian hipster prefers Barack Obama.

Therefore, it should not surprise you that a Christian hipster might consider capitalism over.

Young Protestants today seem to be rebelling against the traditional Protestant work ethic because they associate it with a greedy, selfish, superficial version of the American Dream. Evangelical hipster culture implies that Christians should oppose capitalism and adopt pro-regulation, pro-environmentalism, pro-universal health care political positions to truly live a Christ-like life. (Source)

There is something wrong here. I am pretty certain that many Christian hipsters work hard. In fact, they might even embrace capitalism more than they think. Take for example, increased government regulations would squash freedom and innovation. This is surely something they might be against.

Whether or not they realize it, capitalism is all around them. After all, many of the products they use — whether it be Apple products or Starbucks coffee — began in a capitalist society. It was the free market and innovation that brought many of the modern conveniences they rely upon.

Is Capitalism Over?

by Krystle Gabele

November 14, 2012

Recently, Values and Capitalism, a project of the American Enterprise Institute, has published a blog post about how Christian hipsters are declaring the demise of capitalism.  First, I know what many of you are thinking…what exactly is a Christian hipster and how is capitalism over?

A Christian hipster, according to Brett McCracken, author of “Hipster Christianity: When Church and Cool Collide,” is a young evangelical who strays from the typical stereotypes of the evangelicals of the 80s and 90s and prefers the progressive viewpoints, as well as intellectual Christianity.  While most evangelicals prefer to help Republicans, the Christian hipster prefers Barack Obama. 

Now that we have this lined out, it should not surprise you that a Christian hipster would consider capitalism over. 

Young Protestants today seem to be rebelling against the traditional Protestant work ethic because they associate it with a greedy, selfish, superficial version of the American Dream. Evangelical hipster culture implies that Christians should oppose capitalism and adopt pro-regulation, pro-environmentalism, pro-universal health care political positions to truly live a Christ-like life.

There is something wrong here. I am pretty certain that many Christian hipsters work hard. If they don’t work hard, it becomes impossible to survive. In fact, if they would look at things, they would realize that they promote capitalism more than they think. Take for example, increased government regulations would squash freedom and innovation. This is surely something they might be against.

They do not realize though capitalism is all around them. After all, many of the products they use, whether it be Apple products or Starbucks coffee, received their start due to a capitalist society. It was the free market and innovation that brought many of the modern conveniences they rely upon to light.

So, is capitalism over? No. I have a feeling we will see a reversal from the Christian hipsters soon enough.

Is Profiting from Hurricane Sandy Ethical?

by Rob Schwarzwalder

November 1, 2012

There is a telling story today in one of the nation’s premier business publications, Barron’s, called “Playing a Superstorm.” In it, we read about some home repair-oriented companies whose stock is rising in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. Of course, this makes perfect sense: Given the hurricane’s devastation, the value of firms with the resources needed to rebuild is at a premium. However, as the article notes, “These opportunities to scalp some profits out of the aftermath of the hurricane are likely fleeting, so act fast or do not act at all.”

Scalp some profits” - yikes! Profiting from disaster seems untoward. Yet in a market-based economy, such investments can animate economic growth in regions where it is most needed - places such as those destroyed by this week’s massive “Frankenstorm.”

Every action has three ethical dimensions: Its motivation, its implementation, and its effect. Those on the Left who insist on evaluating every action based on motivation (“greedy capitalists!”) rather than outcome (renewed businesses, reconstructed neighborhoods, etc.) are looking at only one aspect of a larger picture.

I’m not suggesting that motives are unimportant. Rather, at a time of national crisis, aspersing the intentions of those whose investments can help transform extensive damage into rebuilt lives seems a tired and useless exercise. The alternative - a government-run, command-and-control economic system - would never provide the diversity, quantity, or quality of products and services needed when disaster strikes. As scholar Jay Richards wrote in his book Money, Greed, and God, we must be wary of “contrasting capitalism with an unrealizable ideal rather than with its live alternatives” (watch Jay’s thoughtful FRC lecture on this theme here).

Ultimately, it’s about what the Founders called “ordered liberty,” the freedom to make reasonable, moral decisions in an open marketplace. To deny such liberty to image-bearers of God is an affront to human dignity. Our Founders understood this, which is why they valued the right to private property ownership so highly. We should maintain their commitment to free enterprise and opportunity with intentionality and energy; unless we do, when a future “Sandy” hits, we will lack the means to respond with the rapidity and resources they require.

Jesus the Economist? Or Something Else?

by Rob Schwarzwalder

November 4, 2011

Christianity asserts that Jesus of Nazareth was a historical person who lived in the space-time continuum. He had a physical body, felt hunger, had full use of His senses, and worked for years as a skilled laborer.

The New Testament also claims that He was eternal God in the flesh, the Savior of the world Whose atoning death and justifying resurrection are the basis of the redemption of all who will trust in Him for forgiveness.

These propositions are striking enough without the other claims being made about Jesus in the political world, which are many. Consider some recent headlines:

Occupy London are true followers of Jesus, even if they despise religion

What Would Jesus Drive?

Best-selling socialist publication of all time remains the Bible

Jesus was a Communist” - new movie by Matthew Modine,

From Jesus Socialism to Capitalist Christianity,

Marx, Capitalism, and Jesus

What Would Jesus Hack?

Was Jesus an Early Applied Economist?

For the record: Jesus affirmed the right to own property and encouraged honest labor. Several of the disciples were in a fishing business that included ownership of several boats, indicating that they were appropriately ambitious and hard-working (Luke 5:11).

Also, it is a tribute to Jesus enduring, penetrating, and inescapable power that political philosophers, economists, and even entertainers are so eager to nab Him for their agendas.

However, my point is not to get into a discussion about Jesus and His teachings concerning business, taxes, or economics generally. Rather, it is this: Should we not summon the moral courage to deal with His overt and profound claims before we wander off into asking if He would drive a Prius, or if He would support budget reductions? At what point do such musings become trivial, even irreverent?

It is wholly honorable to consider the implications of living a Christ-filled life in contemporary times. Yet the effort to claim Jesus for an ideological agenda or to capture Him as some kind of pre-Marxian redistributionist is ludicrous in itself, and also keeps us from the main issue: Was He the God-Man, the Lord of all, filled with grace and truth, or, as one writer has put it, just a carpenter gone bad?

Shouldnt we be asking the main questions first? Remember, Jesus never said, Follow Me, and become a socialist. Rather, His question was, Who do you say that I am? (Matthew 16:15).

Whats your answer?

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