Tag archives: Religion

In the Know…

by Krystle Gabele

October 1, 2009

Here’s some articles of interest this morning.

In the Know…

by Krystle Gabele

September 30, 2009

Here’s some articles of interest.

In the Know…

by Krystle Gabele

September 28, 2009

Here are some articles of interest.

In the Know…

by Krystle Gabele

September 4, 2009

Here’s some news articles of interest to help kick off Labor Day weekend.

In the Know…

by Krystle Gabele

September 2, 2009

Gone are the days of the Daily Buzz and Blogosphere Buzz. Instead, I decided to incorporate the two to create “In the Know.” Don’t worry, you will still receive your daily dose of news.

Here’s some articles of interest for your morning:

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

August 19, 2009

Here’s some news articles of interest for you to ponder this morning.

  • Clinical Trials Are Testing Stem Cells as Heart Failure Treatment,” Sarah Baldauf, U.S. News & World Report (August 18, 2009)
  • Researchers’ significant interest in using stem cells to treat heart failure arises, in part, because the disease is so prevalent. The American Heart Association estimates 5.7 million Americans live with the disease and 670,000 new cases are diagnosed annually. “When you put [stem cells] into a heart, some can differentiate to become blood vessel and others to become heart muscle cells,” explains James Willerson, president of the Texas Heart Institute in Houston and a principal investigator of a separate, National Institutes of Health-sponsored stem cell trial for heart failure. It is important, he says, that stem cells also “have substances that recruit other cells and promote life.” This combination holds incredibly powerful potential for not only rejuvenating but rebuilding organs and tissue and turning back the clock for ailing patients. Willerson is optimistic about the therapeutic future of stem cells, which can be extracted from fat cells, hair cells, and other diverse cell types. “I believe we will be able to regenerate the whole heart of a human being with stem cells,” he says.”

  • Medical Groups Promoted HPV Vaccine Using Drug Company Money,” Rob Stein, The Washington Post (August 18, 2009)
  • DART Driver Refused Bus With Atheist Sign,” KCCI-8 Des Moines (August 18, 2009)
  • Des Moines Area Regional Transit confirms a driver refused to drive a bus with an atheist advertisement Monday.”

  • Poll: Majority of Americans Understand Health Care Bills Mean Abortion Funding,” Steven Ertelt, LifeNews.com (August 19, 2009)
  • The pro-life movement has been working overtime to educate Americans about the fact that the health care bills in Congress would result in massive abortion funding. Despite a slew of mainstream media stories to the contrary, the public appears to have received the message.

    A new NBC/Wall Street Journal poll released yesterday shows a majority of Americans agreed that the health care bills “will likely use taxpayer dollars to pay for women to have abortions.”

    The poll found 50 percent agreed that is true while 37 percent of Americans don’t believe that is likely.”

  • Law Requiring Ultrasounds for Abortions Is Struck Down,” Kari Lydersen, The Washington Post (August 18, 2009)
  • An Oklahoma judge decided Tuesday that doctors do not need to perform ultrasounds and offer women detailed information about the tests before performing abortions, striking down the strictest such law in the country.”

  • Study Using Embryonic Stem Cells Is Delayed,” Bloomberg News (August 19, 2009)
  • The Geron Corporation said on Tuesday that regulators had held up its study of a therapy for injured spinal cords before even one patient could be enrolled, delaying the first human trial using embryonic stem cells.”

  • Christian Law Firm Fights ‘Ridiculous’ Criminal Charges Against School Officials,” Nathan Black, The Christian Post (August 18, 2009)

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

August 14, 2009

Here’s some news articles of particular interest.

  • According to the New York Times, former President Bill Clinton defends end-of-life counseling that is included in the health care reform plan.
  • Steven Ertelt of LifeNews.com has a great article about a CDC study that shows teen abortion rates are lower in states that accept abstinence funding.
  • Cleveland is becoming a leader in adult stem cell research. Continue reading the article from The Plain Dealer.
  • David French of Phi Beta Cons reported Tuesday that the EEOC went after Belmont Abbey College in North Carolina for refusing to cover oral contraceptives in its employer provided health insurance.
  • Prisoners in the Rappahannock Regional Jail in Virginia will now be allowed to receive religious mail, after the ACLU sent a letter to officials demanding that these letters containing biblical passages be distributed, as The Christian Post reports.

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

August 11, 2009

After a long hiatus, the Daily Buzz is back. Here are some news articles that I found particularly interesting today.

  • The Obama Administration has been fairly silent about the provisions for abortion in the health care bill. The Baptist Press has a great article about the Administration’s silence on the provisions.
  • Kansas is back in the news again. This time, The Wichita Eagle reports that the Governor and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment has stripped funding from a program that gives state money to groups who provide alternatives to abortion.
  • This morning, I came across an interesting article by Eric Gorski of the Associated Press that discussed the conflict of young Evangelical Christians torn between premarital sex and waiting for marriage. Continue reading…
  • The controversial health care bill that will be debated in Congress will provide doctors incentive to push euthanasia. Read more about this on LifeNews.com.
  • The Christian Post reports that homeschoolers are scoring well above those attending public schools in reading, math, social studies, and language.
  • If you haven’t already done so, read Nonie Darwish’s article in FrontPage Magazine about Islam.

Paul Schneider: Martyr of Buchenwald

by Benjamin Scott

July 21, 2009

Seventy years ago on this month Paul Schneider, Germanys first Christian martyr under Nazi rule, died heroically in the concentration camp of Buchenwald. Seventy years ago from this month, Schneiders fight against the evils and wickedness of his age ended in glorious victory as he proclaimed the message of the gospel to those killing him. It is appropriate to remember such a brave man, and to be inspired by his bold stand against Nazi Germany.

Paul Schneider was born in a little town of Pherdsfeld, in northern Bavaria. His father was a Christian pastor and a loyal German citizen. Paul had great respect for his father and as a youth knew he wanted to go into the pastorate.

Paul fought for Kaiser Wilhelm II in World War I and, due to the battle wounds he received, earned the famous Iron Cross award from the military.

After the war, he attended seminary in answering the call to go into the ministry. As a young pastor, his life and the life of his country changed dramatically in 1933. That year, Adolph Hitler became the dictator of Germany.

From the beginning of the Nazi regime, Hitler targeted the German churches as a means of spreading his message and his own gospel. Unlike his fellow pastors, however, Paul Schneider refused to pollute the Gospel of Christ with the doctrines of the Nazi Party.

Schneider asked this question in a sermon to his congregation in 1934:

Where are those Christian consciences who judge righteously, who take the standard for their politics neither from National Socialism nor from socialism, but rather from the Gospel?

Despite immense pressure to stay quiet and not stand up for the truth of the gospel, Schneider became the lone vocal advocate of the Gospel and truths of Jesus Christ in his community.

He allowed only true Christians to partake of the Lords Supper and fought against incorporating the Nazi political agenda in his church.

After continuing Nazi persecution, Paul Schneider was arrested and sent to the Nazi concentration camp in Buchenwald, Germany.

Despite torture, beatings, humiliation, hunger, and terrible suffering, Schneiders message did not change.

He preached the Gospel from his confinement cell, and warned the Nazi guards and officers of Gods coming judgment on sin.

I must call the evil - of which I am a witness-as it really is and to make clear to the SS that they are not escaping the judgment of God, Schneider said of his protest against the Nazi guards. I am God’s messenger in this prison.

Finally Paul Schneider met his martyrdom on July 18, 1939. Schneider fell into the grip of Ding Schuler, a Nazi doctor, known as the experimental doctor. Schneider was murdered by lethal injection and his faithful wife Margarete brought his body back home for burial.

In the presence of Nazi guards, this prayer was prayed over Paul Schneiders grave:

May God grant that the witness of your Shepherd our brother remain with you and continue to impact on future generations and that it remain vital and bear fruit in the entire Christian Church.

May the life and death of Paul Schneider inspire followers of Christ here and in Europe to stand up for the timeless truths of Jesus, living out their callings in modern society.

Benjamin Scott is a summer intern at Family Research Council. He is a student at Covenant College. Benjamin Scott and his missionary family lived in Germany for eight years.

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

July 15, 2009

Here’s what we are reading today.

Archives