Tag archives: Religion

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

August 14, 2009

Here’s some news articles of particular interest.

  • According to the New York Times, former President Bill Clinton defends end-of-life counseling that is included in the health care reform plan.
  • Steven Ertelt of LifeNews.com has a great article about a CDC study that shows teen abortion rates are lower in states that accept abstinence funding.
  • Cleveland is becoming a leader in adult stem cell research. Continue reading the article from The Plain Dealer.
  • David French of Phi Beta Cons reported Tuesday that the EEOC went after Belmont Abbey College in North Carolina for refusing to cover oral contraceptives in its employer provided health insurance.
  • Prisoners in the Rappahannock Regional Jail in Virginia will now be allowed to receive religious mail, after the ACLU sent a letter to officials demanding that these letters containing biblical passages be distributed, as The Christian Post reports.

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

August 11, 2009

After a long hiatus, the Daily Buzz is back. Here are some news articles that I found particularly interesting today.

  • The Obama Administration has been fairly silent about the provisions for abortion in the health care bill. The Baptist Press has a great article about the Administration’s silence on the provisions.
  • Kansas is back in the news again. This time, The Wichita Eagle reports that the Governor and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment has stripped funding from a program that gives state money to groups who provide alternatives to abortion.
  • This morning, I came across an interesting article by Eric Gorski of the Associated Press that discussed the conflict of young Evangelical Christians torn between premarital sex and waiting for marriage. Continue reading…
  • The controversial health care bill that will be debated in Congress will provide doctors incentive to push euthanasia. Read more about this on LifeNews.com.
  • The Christian Post reports that homeschoolers are scoring well above those attending public schools in reading, math, social studies, and language.
  • If you haven’t already done so, read Nonie Darwish’s article in FrontPage Magazine about Islam.

Paul Schneider: Martyr of Buchenwald

by Benjamin Scott

July 21, 2009

Seventy years ago on this month Paul Schneider, Germanys first Christian martyr under Nazi rule, died heroically in the concentration camp of Buchenwald. Seventy years ago from this month, Schneiders fight against the evils and wickedness of his age ended in glorious victory as he proclaimed the message of the gospel to those killing him. It is appropriate to remember such a brave man, and to be inspired by his bold stand against Nazi Germany.

Paul Schneider was born in a little town of Pherdsfeld, in northern Bavaria. His father was a Christian pastor and a loyal German citizen. Paul had great respect for his father and as a youth knew he wanted to go into the pastorate.

Paul fought for Kaiser Wilhelm II in World War I and, due to the battle wounds he received, earned the famous Iron Cross award from the military.

After the war, he attended seminary in answering the call to go into the ministry. As a young pastor, his life and the life of his country changed dramatically in 1933. That year, Adolph Hitler became the dictator of Germany.

From the beginning of the Nazi regime, Hitler targeted the German churches as a means of spreading his message and his own gospel. Unlike his fellow pastors, however, Paul Schneider refused to pollute the Gospel of Christ with the doctrines of the Nazi Party.

Schneider asked this question in a sermon to his congregation in 1934:

Where are those Christian consciences who judge righteously, who take the standard for their politics neither from National Socialism nor from socialism, but rather from the Gospel?

Despite immense pressure to stay quiet and not stand up for the truth of the gospel, Schneider became the lone vocal advocate of the Gospel and truths of Jesus Christ in his community.

He allowed only true Christians to partake of the Lords Supper and fought against incorporating the Nazi political agenda in his church.

After continuing Nazi persecution, Paul Schneider was arrested and sent to the Nazi concentration camp in Buchenwald, Germany.

Despite torture, beatings, humiliation, hunger, and terrible suffering, Schneiders message did not change.

He preached the Gospel from his confinement cell, and warned the Nazi guards and officers of Gods coming judgment on sin.

I must call the evil - of which I am a witness-as it really is and to make clear to the SS that they are not escaping the judgment of God, Schneider said of his protest against the Nazi guards. I am God’s messenger in this prison.

Finally Paul Schneider met his martyrdom on July 18, 1939. Schneider fell into the grip of Ding Schuler, a Nazi doctor, known as the experimental doctor. Schneider was murdered by lethal injection and his faithful wife Margarete brought his body back home for burial.

In the presence of Nazi guards, this prayer was prayed over Paul Schneiders grave:

May God grant that the witness of your Shepherd our brother remain with you and continue to impact on future generations and that it remain vital and bear fruit in the entire Christian Church.

May the life and death of Paul Schneider inspire followers of Christ here and in Europe to stand up for the timeless truths of Jesus, living out their callings in modern society.

Benjamin Scott is a summer intern at Family Research Council. He is a student at Covenant College. Benjamin Scott and his missionary family lived in Germany for eight years.

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

July 15, 2009

Here’s what we are reading today.

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

July 13, 2009

Here’s what we are reading today.

  • NIH received varied responses, some poignant, on stem-cell draft,” Nancy Frazier O’Brien, Catholic News Service (July 10, 2009)
  • Although many of the more than 49,000 comments received by the National Institutes of Health on their draft guidelines for embryonic stem-cell research are repetitive, some offer a poignant glimpse into the lives of Americans who don’t want to see embryos destroyed in an effort to cure diseases.

  • Clarence Thomas: The courage of his convictions,” Michael Barone, The Washington Examiner (July 12, 2009)
  • Spain liberalizing, but teen abortion hits a nerve,” Daniel Woolls, Associated Press (July 12, 2009)
  • Spain’s Socialist prime minister has irked his natural enemies on the right and in the Catholic church by legalizing gay marriage and instituting fast-track divorce. Now he has hit a raw nerve even among his supporters with a proposal to let 16-year-olds get abortions without parental consent.

    The debate is harsh and emotional, showing that for all the changes Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero has introduced with his trailblazing social agenda since taking power in 2004, abortion remains sensitive in a country where most people call themselves Catholic, even if few churches are full on Sundays.

  • One child rule,” Alisa Harris, WORLD Magazine (July 13, 2009)
  • The Chinese government’s population policy requires delayed marriages and delayed births, meaning citizens have to wait for government permission to reproduce. It also advocates “fewer births”one child in most cases, but two if the first is a girl. The final plank”healthier” birthscovers a policy that Mosher said leads to sterilization and killing visibly disabled babies at birth.

  • House Strips Funding for Abstinence Education,” Christian News Wire (July 12, 2009)
  • Federal funding for abstinence until marriage education was stripped from the budget today in the House subcommittee, led by Rep. David Obey (D-WI). The budget now goes to the full committee and to the full House of Representatives.”

  • Korean bishops reject measure that would allow euthanasia,” Catholic News Agency (July 13, 2009)
  • The Bishops of South Korea have rejected a measure that would legalize euthanasia in the country. Supporters of the measure are euphemistically labeling the proposal death with dignity.”

  • Religion and spirituality: Can faith help you heal?,” Eve Glicksman, KTNV (July 13, 2009)
  • Research suggests there is a link between religion and better mental health and well-being. Some spiritual practices may reduce stress. This may also ease symptoms and help offset the harmful effects of stress on the immune, endocrine and cardiovascular systems. Some studies have shown that people of faith recover faster from depression, grief and anxiety disorders.”

  • Oak Park man has own stem cells implanted in heart,” Kim Lamb Gregory, Ventura County Star (July 13, 2009)

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

July 10, 2009

Here’s what we are reading today.

  • Federal Law excluding Gay Marriage is under siege,” Michael B. Farrell, Christian Science Monitor (July 9, 2009)
  • Five years after it became the first state to marry same-sex couples, Massachusetts is taking on the federal governments definition of marriage.

    While other lawsuits have challenged the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), which was passed in 1996 and defined marriage as between a man and woman, Massachusetts is the first to argue that Congress overstepped its bounds and violated a states right to determine what constitutes marriage.

  • Survey: Science Just One Ingredient of Opinion Cocktail,” Emily Badger, Miller-McCune (July 9, 2009)
  • Although people like science, they are not bound by what science shows,” said Alan I. Leshner, the AAAS’s CEO and executive publisher of the journal Science. “Advances in science over the course of last decade are coming into conflict with some core human values issues, whether it’s when life begins or what you believe about evolution. Only scientists are stuck with what science is showing. The public at large and policy-makers are free to deny, disagree or just disregard what the science is showing. Scientists don’t have that luxury.”

  • Group asks Tracy to drop religion from invocations,” Mike Martinez, San Joaquin Herald (July 9, 2009)
  • In a six-page letter to the city, the attorney for the Madison, Wisc.-based Freedom From Religion Foundation wrote demanding an end to the practice.

    The City Council of Tracy cannot, under current federal and state law, permit any prayers that contain references to an explicit deity,” wrote attorney Rebecca Kratz. “The prayers currently given during council meetings impermissibly advance Christianity and lead a reasonable observer to believe that the council is endorsing not only religion over non religion, but also Christianity over other faiths.”

  • Marriage showdown imminent in Maine,” Charlie Butts, OneNewsNow (July 10, 2009)
  • Although the legislature passed it and Governor John Baldacci approved the same-sex marriage bill in May, the law is on hold. Maine considers the people to be a branch of the government, and they can exercise a People’s Veto. Mary Conroy of Stand for Marriage tells OneNewsNow that means gathering enough signatures to put the issue before voters.

  • White House Says Obama, Pope Benedict XVI Will Have “Frank” Talk on Abortion,” Steven Ertelt, LifeNews.com (July 8, 2009)
  • The relationship between Obama and Catholics has been tenuous. The pro-life teachings of the Catholic Church and Obama’s pro-abortion views have been at odds since the beginning of his presidency.

    Before Obama took over the White House, the nation’s Catholic bishops warned him not to aggressively promote abortion and not to include abortion in his health care restructuring proposal.

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

July 8, 2009

Here’s what we are reading today.

  • Mass. challenges federal Defense of Marriage Act,” Martin Finucane, The Boston Globe (July 8, 2009)
  • Massachusetts, the first state in the nation to legalize gay marriage, has become the first to challenge the constitutionality of a federal law that defines marriage as the union of a man and a woman, saying Congress intruded into a matter that should be left to individual states.

  • Scientists claim sperm ‘first’,” Fergus Walsh, BBC News (July 7, 2009)
  • This research also raises ethical issues. Josephine Quintavalle from Comment on Reproductive Ethics (Corethics) said: “This is an example of immoral madness. Perfectly viable human embryos have been destroyed in order to create sperm over which there will be huge questions of their healthiness and viability.

    It’s taking one life in order to perhaps create another. I’m very much in favour of curing infertility but I don’t think you can do whatever you like.”

  • Could Abortion Coverage Sink Health-Care Reform?,” Karen Tumulty, Time (July 8, 2009)
  • Gay marriage foes reach signature goal in Maine,” Associated Press (July 8, 2009)
  • Mark Mutty from the Stand for Marriage Maine coalition says it took only four weeks to gather the more than 55,087 signatures necessary to put gay marriage to a vote. But he says signature gathering will continue to ensure theres more than enough petitions.”

  • School district shapes religious policy,” Associated Press (July 8, 2009)
  • Spencer public school officials are proposing a policy that will allow students to study the Bible and pray during graduation ceremonies.

    The proposal, if adopted, will have schools offer elective classes that permit arguments against evolution and discussions on the Bible in history and literature. School officials say they want to set clear rules for religious expression.”

  • Cerebral Palsy Improves After Bone Marrow Stem Cell Procedure,” PR Newswire (July 8, 2009)
  • Dr. David Steenblock of Mission Viejo, California, a pioneer in clinical applications of stem cells, is pleased to report the results of a 16 year old girl who suffered from cerebral palsy. The patient had right side paralysis and spasticity since birth. The procedure consisted of removing 300 milliliters of bone marrow from her hip and giving it back to her intravenously.”

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

July 6, 2009

Here’s what we are reading today.

  • Same-sex unions a challenge for Census,” Haya El Nasser, USA Today (July 5, 2009)
  • If the Census uses current methods, it would “unmarry people who checked off ‘married couples,’ ” even in states where same-sex marriage is legal…

  • Minister sues city over right to protest abortion,” Lee Tant, The Times and Democrat (July 5, 2009)
  • Asking God for peace, and help in job search,” Associated Press (July 5, 2009)
  • Castro’s group is one of several church-related unemployment support groups that have formed around the country as the jobless rate reaches heights not seen for decades. On Thursday, the government reported a 9.5 percent unemployment rate for June, the worst in 26 years.

    Job seekers can’t use God as a reference, and studying Scripture might seem unrelated to grabbing a prospective employer’s attention. But church support group members say the meetings aren’t just about helping people find the next job; they’re also about refining and strengthening their faith along the way.”

  • Embryonic Stem Cellsand Other Stem CellsPromise to Advance Treatments,” Katherine Hobson, U.S. News & World Report (July 2, 2009)
  • The earliest therapeutic breakthroughs are likely to arise from adult stem cells, which exist in everybody in many subtypesblood-producing stem cells in the bone marrow, for example, and stem cells in the brain that can become neurons and other brain cells. “In the short termsay, the next five yearsmost of the therapeutic applications from stem cells will be from adult stem cells,” says Steven Stice, director of the Regenerative Bioscience Center at the University of Georgia. Their most likely uses: disorders of the blood and blood vessels, bone, and immune systems, he says.

  • No glib utterances,” Andree Seu, WORLD Magazine (July 18, 2009)
  • God’s commands turn out to be doorways to intimacy with Him. And the best kept secret about obedience in the face of a hard temptation is that there is a blessing waiting on the other side. Satan doesn’t want us to know that. He would prefer the usual succumb-and-repent routine.”

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

July 1, 2009

Here’s what we are reading today.

  • Abortions down slightly in Minnesota,” Bob Von Sternberg, The Star Tribune (July 1, 2009)
  • According to the annual report by the Minnesota Department of Health, 12,948 abortions were performed last year, 895 fewer than in 2007.

  • Report: Abortions drop for fifth straight year in Wisconsin,” Associated Press (June 30, 2009)
  • A state report released Tuesday found 8,229 abortions were performed in the state last year, down from 8,267 in 2007. The number of abortions in the state has fallen for five straight years now.

  • Liberty’s champion,” Marvin Olasky, WORLD Magazine (July 4, 2009)
  • Calvin was a fallen sinner, as all of us are, but was he especially mean-spirited? He taught that God created the world out of love and loved the world so much that Christ came down from the glorious kingdom of heaven and plunged into this world’s muck.

  • Conservative Christian groups form new federation,” Jody Brown, OneNewsNow (July 1, 2009)
  • Ouch! Planned Parenthood stung again…,” Charlie Butts, OneNewsNow (July 1, 2009)
  • We want the attorney general of the state of Alabama to take this seriously and do his own investigation to find out what further is happening and convict Planned Parenthood where appropriate,” she says. “And we also hope the legislators pay attention so that if there is any state or local funding going to Planned Parenthood, that they can immediately cut the funding.”

  • Fixing The Heart With Stem Cells,” Bill Whitaker, CBS News (June 29, 2009)
  • This week doctors in Los Angeles have given a heart attack patient an infusion of stem cells grown from his own heart muscle.

Daily Buzz

by Krystle Gabele

June 29, 2009

Here’s what we are reading today.

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