Tag archives: Review

The Chosen: A Fresh, Personal, and Faithful Presentation of the Gospel

by Dan Hart

April 15, 2021

If ever there was a time that needs fresh witness to the truth of the gospel, it is our current moment. As the uncertainties of government overreach and simmering social and political tensions continue, the human heart can’t help but yearn for stability and reassurance. It’s a time when Jesus’s beautiful words in Matthew’s Gospel have never been more desperately needed: “Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me; for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light” (Matthew 11:28-30).

Depicting the fulfilment and peace that only Christ can bring to a post-Christian culture in a compelling and original way is no easy task, but one filmmaker has found a remarkable way to succeed. With The Chosen, a new drama series based on the life of Christ, writer/producer/director Dallas Jenkins has breathed new life into the biblical epic genre in a groundbreaking way.

The Chosen is the first ever episode-based series about the life of Christ. In order to produce the series, streaming video company VidAngel and Jenkins decided to use online crowdfunding. It became the biggest crowdfunded film project ever, with over $10.2 million raised by January 2019. In April and November of that year, the first series of eight episodes was released online, and they have been viewed almost 50 million times in 180 countries. The Chosen’s producers have already raised another $10 million for the production of the second season, with the first three episodes now released. The producers are planning to continue crowdsourcing for the foreseeable future, with the goal of producing seven seasons in all.

The great strength of The Chosen is its emphasis on relationship and relatability. The series starts by portraying the disciples and Christ’s other followers as honest, searching, flawed, and often humorous men and women who are trying to make their way as faithful Jews in a harsh Roman-occupied world. Peter and Andrew struggle to figure out how to pay their taxes as poor fishermen, Mary Magdalene grapples with demons and finding direction while trying to move past her former sinful lifestyle, and Matthew is a highly eccentric and reviled tax collector who wrestles with social stigmatization. With great emotional depth and feeling, The Chosen beautifully shows how Jesus breaks into the lives of these ordinary men and women and sets their hearts ablaze with a longing for truth and a burning desire to follow Him.

Much of the success of The Chosen can be attributed to the deeply human and pastorally empathetic portrayal of Jesus by actor Jonathan Roumie. With past film depictions of Jesus often emphasizing His stoic authority and divinity, the great strength of Roumie’s depiction is that he lets Jesus be approachable and sympathetic without sacrificing Christ’s sovereignty. In a scene drawn from Luke 5, Roumie’s Jesus laughs with joy and revels in the moment as He watches Simon and his brother whoop and holler as they struggle to drag in the miraculous catch of fish. In one poetic shot, Jesus is so moved that He glances up to the heavens, as if He Himself is in awe of the wonderful work of His Father. A few moments later, Simon cannot help but fall at Jesus’ feet and mumble about his unworthiness. Jesus’s face is seen from a low camera angled up, clearly establishing His divinity as He responds to Simon’s inquiry (“You are the lamb of God, yes?”) with a simple, “I Am.” But then Jesus crouches down to Simon’s level, and with a penetrating yet compassionate gaze, extends an invitation: “Follow Me.” The scene masterfully combines the human and the divine.   

Other scenes breathe new layers of meaning into familiar gospel stories. As Jesus stands in front of the stone jars of water at the wedding at Cana, the scene is intercut with a wedding guest describing the work of a sculptor: “Once you make that first cut into the stone, it can’t be undone. It sets in motion a series of choices. What used to be a shapeless block of limestone or granite begins its long journey of transformation, and it will never be the same.” The metaphor is a perfect one: by turning the water into wine, like a sculptor’s first cut, Jesus knows that his public ministry will begin, and there will be no turning back. “I am ready, Father,” Jesus murmurs, before dipping his hand into the water, and taking it out with wine dripping from it.

The most pivotal scene from the first season is the encounter at night between Jesus and Nicodemus from John 3. Actor Erick Avari perfectly captures how a member of the Sanhedrin would have been torn between his position in Jewish society as a scholar of the law and what his heart is telling him about who Jesus really is. As Nicodemus’s incredulity and questions turn into awe and trembling before the Messiah as He unveils the heart of God’s salvific plan, the viewer can’t help but empathize with the Pharisee’s predicament but also be spellbound all over again by Christ’s immortal words of John 3:16. 

The Chosen isn’t without its flaws. Scenes early in the first season, particularly ones with Roman characters and costumes, come off as a bit gimmicky, and at times, the tone of some scenes in the first two seasons feel a little too comic and unserious. 

Still, for believers, The Chosen will deepen the vision of the gospels in your mind’s eye, and in the process may even deepen your faith. And for unbelievers, The Chosen is a personal, welcoming invitation to explore the Truth of the gospel. As the Scriptures say, time is short (1 Corinthians 7:29; James 5:8; Revelation 22:12), and the need for cultural renewal in Christ is staggeringly great. A tech-savvy, revitalized, and imaginative yet faithful presentation of the gospel could not have come at a better moment.

The Social Conservative Review: March 13, 2014

by Krystle Gabele

March 13, 2014

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Dear Friends:

The director of FRC’s Center for Human Dignity, Arina Grossu, was in New York this week for the U.N.’s Conference on Women. At event in a packed room, co-sponsored by our friends at the Catholic Family Association and REAL Women of Canada, Arina gave a convincing presentation on lowering maternal mortality around the world and how the UN should not focus on abortion legalization or “reproductive rights” but on real medical solutions to lower the risk of maternal mortality.

Abortion remains one of our great national shames, and is extending well beyond surgical procedures. As Arina wrote earlier this week in The Daily Caller, “Early medical abortions are on the rise … Using gestational data from the CDC, Guttmacher estimated that 36 percent of abortions up to nine weeks’ gestation in 2011 were early medication procedures compared to 26 percent in 2008.”

But there’s good news, too: Last week, the Alabama state legislature passed four bills designed to curtail abortion, including “a fetal heartbeat bill, which would ban abortion when the fetal heartbeat is detected at about six weeks.”

The fight for life continues. The unborn deserve the protection of law. Their mothers deserve better than the exploitation of the abortion industry. Whether at the U.N. or in the states, FRC is working with our pro-life allies to achieve those great goals. Thanks for standing with us as we stand with the most vulnerable of us all.

Sincerely,

Rob Schwarzwalder
Senior Vice President
Family Research Council

P.S. Download (at no charge) Senior Fellow Peter Sprigg’s new study, “Understanding Windsor: What the Supreme Court Ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act Did - and Did Not - Say” here.


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The Social Conservative Review: April 25, 2013

by Krystle Gabele

April 25, 2013

Click here to subscribe to the Social Conservative Review.


Dear Friends:

As the father of two Boy Scouts, it’s been hard to see the BSA teeter on the edge of moral irrelevance. The proposed “compromise resolution” regarding “open and avowed” homosexuality in Scouting is not the reaching of a middle ground. It is little more than a fall off of a cliff. As FRC President Tony Perkins put it:

The resolution requires all Scouting families and faith-based organizations that object to homosexuality on religious grounds to affirm its moral validity. It introduces open and overt sexuality into an organization that is designed to foster character and leadership, thereby clouding Scouting’s most fundamental purposes. And the proposal says, in essence, that homosexuality is morally acceptable until a boy turns 18 - then, when he comes of age, he’s removed from the Scouts. The policy is incoherent and, sadly, an affront to the notion that Scouts are brave, reverent, and “morally straight.”

It’s in the spirit of the Scout Oath and Law that FRC will be hosting a simulcast titled, “Stand with Scouts Sunday,” at 7:00 PM on May 5th. The program will feature Eagle Scouts and religious and political leaders from across the country. Join us to learn what steps you can take to keep Scouting as its founders envisioned it - as a resource for boys and young men to develop in character, confidence, and leadership, without the intrusion of sexual controversy. Click here to register.

Theodore Roosevelt is the only American in history designated as Chief Scout Citizen. His words about the Scouts hold true today:

The Boy Scout movement is distinctly an asset to our country … It is essential that its leaders be men of strong, wholesome character; of unmistakable devotion to our country, its customs and ideals.

The Rough Rider had it right. Do we still, in our time?

On my honor,

Rob Schwarzwalder
Senior Vice President
Family Research Council


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To read about the latest advances in ethical adult stem cell research, keep up with leading-edge reports from FRC’s Dr. David Prentice, click here.

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